Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘paper dolls’

These lovely paper dolls by Tom Tierney show the fashions of the middle/merchant class of the Baroque and Rococo periods.  Styles worn by the nobles and royalty were similar in structure, but much more extravagant and exaggerated.

 

PLATE 1

c. 1650    The woman wears a high-waisted dress with a falling, wide lace collar and turned-back lace cuffs common during the early Baroque era.  The man wears a cavalier-style outfit with a high-waisted jacket, wide lace collar, lace cuffs, and high boots.  Decorative canes became very popular during this period and many men would carry them around as an accessory.

 

PLATE 2

c. 1660    The woman on the left wears the German fashions of the period, with puffed sleeves, a small hooped skirt, and a fur hat.  The woman on the right is dressed in the Scandinavian style, with a brocade palatine or capelet over her shoulders and a white cap.  Both women wear decorative aprons and a “housewife” hanging from their waists.

 

PLATE 3

c. 1670    The woman wears a wide collar trimmed with ermine fur, a muff, a hood, and a velvet mask to keep out the cold.  Her underskirt is trimmed with gold embroidery and her bodice and sleeves are trimmed with ribbons.  The man wears a long coat, breeches with hose underneath, and a wide-brimmed hat with feathers on it.  He also carries a cane.

 

PLATE 4

c. 1690    The man wears Rhinegrave breeches under a long, buttoned coat, a lace jabot, and large boots.  His hair is worn long and free in the style of Louis XIV.  The woman wears a high fontage headdress and the stiff stomacher that returned to fashion in the latter part of the Baroque period.  Her decorative apron, headdress, and sleeves are all lavishly trimmed with lace.

 

PLATE 5

c. 1720    This period was a transition from Baroque to Rococo fashions, and so incorporated styles from both eras.  The man wears a long coat buttons at the middle, knee breeches, hose, and buckled shoes.  His sleeves are loose and cuffed, showing the undershirt underneath.  The woman wears a flowered robe à l’anglais with large cuffs and a lace collar.

 

PLATE 6

c. 1730    Both women wear a robe à la française in the “Watteau” or “flying” style, in which the back hung loose from the bodice.  Small panniers are worn, but only aristocratic women and royalty wore the ridiculously wide panniers.  The woman on the right’s bodice is adorned with ribbon bows down the front and has large cuffed sleeves.  The woman on the left wears a lace cap common during the period.

 

PLATE 7

c. 1750    The woman on the left wears a hooded capuchin cape trimmed with fur and ribbons.  The woman on the right wears a gown with large cuffed sleeves and a fichu around the neck and shoulders.  She also wears a mobcap tied under the chin with a ribbon.

 

PLATE 8

c. 1770    The woman wears a solid colored gown with embroidery at the opening of the overskirt and bodice.  A quilted underskirt is worn underneath.  She also has sleeves flared at the elbow and wears her hair powdered and curled, common during the last part of the Rococo era.  The man wears a brocade silk vest under a long coat lined with silk with large buttonholes down the side, as well as a tricorn hat and buckled shoes.  His hair is also powdered and is tied back with a ribbon.

Read Full Post »

As I promised earlier, I scanned some of the best of the paper dolls to visually show the styles of the nobility/middle class from around 1200-1450 in Western Europe, especially England and France.  They are generally shown in chronological order.  All of the terms are defined in my previous post.

 

PLATE 1

c. 1200    The woman is wearing a black wool surcoat over a pleated chainse, and a porkpie hat over her hair.  This style of a loose, vertical gown was frequent in the earlier Medieval period.  The man is wearing a particolored cotehardie and a surgarloaf hat, all over his hose and leather shoes.

 

 PLATE 2

 c. 1250    The woman is wearing a pale green cotehardie with a full skirt and sleeves over a maroon chainse.  Belts were often worn as in this picture to hold up the skirts and allow for freer movements.  Low-waisted belts would remain the fashion until the late fourteenth century.  She is also wearing a chatelaine to carry household items.  She wears a gorget and wimple over her hair and neck.  The man wears a fur houppeland with the leather on the outside and a leather belt with another form of a chatelaine.

 

PLATE 3

c. 1300    Here the woman is wearing a sideless/cutaway surcoat laced up the front over a blue cotehardie.  This style of surcoat was looked down on by the church because it accentuated the feminine figure.  Her hair is worn loose down her back, usually only acceptable for younger women and girls.  The man is wearing a short green cotehardie and an orange chaperon with a long liripipe attached.  The points of his shoes are a bit more elongated, and they would continue to get more and more so throughout the period.

 

PLATE 4

c. 1350    Here the woman wears a pelicon made from a huge piece of elliptical fabric with slits cuts for the arms and head.  A hood is attached to the neck and buttons down the front.  She also wears a wimple over her hair.  At this point wearing hair loosely and uncovered was considered unacceptable, which eventually gave rise to elaborate headdresses.   The man wears a short cotehardie and hose under a tabard faced with fur.  His cap is draped with woolen cloth. 

 

PLATE 5

c. 1350    The man wears a blue tappert with padded shoulders and slashed sleeves.  His hose are particolored white and light blue.  The woman wears a rolled and padded hennin worn over a caul and draped with a veil.  Her surcoat is worn over a brocade cotehardie and lined with fur, as are the dalmation sleeves.  High-waisted gowns became the fashion for the rest of the Medieval period. 

 

PLATE 6

c. 1400    The man wears a red houppeland with dagged dalmation sleeves and a chaperon which is also dagged.   The woman wears a dress with a style very popular in this period.  The neckline forms a deep V to the waistband, with a ruched bib underneath coming up higher to the neckline.  The blue gown is trimmed with red velvet.  This style of gown was often known as a “Burgundian gown.”  She wears a hennin with a butterfly styled veil.

 

PLATE 7

c. 1450    The man wears a short pourpoint jacket lined with fur.  His hat is trimmed with a gold coronet.  The woman wears an escoffion with a veil and gold ribbon attached.  Her brocade gown has fur-lined dalmation sleeves.  Jewels and gold were often used to line clothing of the nobility as a means to display wealth. 

 

PLATE 8

c. 1450  The man wears a “shockingly” short tunic that became popular in this period.  The feet of his hose are pointed and tipped by bells.  Bells were often used on many garments, especially belts, purses, and shoes.  The woman wears a gown with bag sleeves trimmed in fur.  Her headdress is a more modern version of the toque, worn with a butterfly veil.

 

Read Full Post »

The other day I pulled out some paper dolls I had when I was little and kept all these years.  Seeing how I always loved anything that I could dress up, paper dolls were some of my most valuable commodities in my younger days.  These particular paper dolls are not just like any others I had – they are historical paper dolls, and probably meant more for historians and costume designers than for little girls.  Yes, I know, I’m a dork.  But, when pulling them out again, I realized just how much information is stored in the front and back flaps of the books–literally paragraphs of detailed descriptions and commentary in itty bitty print.  In seeing this information, I decided these books (I have 6, all done by the same artist), which happen to cover the major areas of European historical fashion, are going to be a major source of information for this project.  I may even try to scan some of the costumes because they are skillfully drawn and are truly lovely.  But I may as well start with the medieval ones, so here follows the information I have gathered as of yet:

During centuries 100-900 AD, usually called the Dark Ages, people mostly wore relatively uncreative and uncolorful clothing.  Apparel was usually similar to Classical styles (Roman and Byzantine), which were tunics and cloaks of coarse cloth, with added fur and layers.  Clothing was usually woolen with linen undergarments.  However, with the development of the feudal system and manorialism, class distinction became very important.  At first, the length of clothing was the major stylistic difference between ranks, with nobles wearing floor-length gowns and tunics and peasants wearing shorter garments.  Eventually the nobles developed much more variety and extravagance in their clothing. 

This was very much assisted by the Crusades, which brought in bright fabrics and thread from the Middle East.  Brocades, silks, and velvets, all in a variety of colors, as well as gold thread, were suddenly introduced into society.  Since medieval life was for the most part monotonous and relatively dark, people delighted in color and portrayed this in their clothing.  Colors came to have symbolic meanings:  blue for fidelity, green for passion, gray for pensiveness, and yellow for anger.  Increased travel and international trade allowed for fashions and ideas to be spread throughout the Western European countries.  Jewelry and intricate embellishments became ever more popular and important, as did hat styles for both men and women. 

All of these factors served to increase the role fashion played in society, so much so that social position legally dictated what someone wore.  Courts passed sumptuary laws that restricted the extravagance of clothing and jewelry of people not of the aristocracy, regardless of wealth.  However, these laws were often evaded by people determined to keep up with the latest fashions. 

One thing that I found very interesting is that there are very few clothing items that survived from the medieval era, primarily because clothes were worn until they fell apart because they were such a valuable commodity.  Peasants would sometimes even wear the castoffs and worn-down clothing of their masters. Used clothing was actually a very successful market. 

Clothing played such an important part in their society.  It was probably similar to the role of cars in our modern culture–the kind of car you have usually denotes your financial status, and even earns you more respect.  It’s interesting to think about just how materialistic our human nature is.

Read Full Post »